Liver Issues

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Fatty Liver

Fatty liver means the accumulation of fat in the liver cells. Fatty liver (steatosis) may be associated with or may lead to inflammation of the liver (steatohepatits, NASH). This can cause scarring and hardening of the liver. When scarring becomes severe, it is called cirrhosis, and this is a serious condition.

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HEPATITIS (General)

Hepatitis is a general term meaning inflammation of the liver. Hepatitis is a disease that can be caused by a variety of different causes such as viruses, alcohol, drugs, autoimmune.

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HEPATITIS A

Hepatitis A is a liver infection caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). The virus is spread when a non-immune person eats or drinks something contaminated by virus. Unlike hepatitis B and C, hepatitis A infection does not cause chronic liver disease.

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HEPATITIS B

Hepatitis B virus can cause chronic liver disease which may progress to liver cirrhosis and liver cancer. A vaccine against hepatitis B has been available since 1982. Hepatitis B vaccine is 95% effective in preventing HBV infection.

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HEPATITIS C

Hepatitis C virus can cause chronic liver disease which may progress to liver cirrhosis and liver cancer.

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HEPATITIS E

Hepatitis E was not recognized as a distinct human disease until 1980. Hepatitis E is caused by infection with the hepatitis E virus.

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HEPATITIS (General)

Hepatitis is a general term meaning inflammation of the liver. Hepatitis is a disease that can be caused by a variety of different causes such as viruses, alcohol, drugs, autoimmune.

HEPATITIS (General)
HEPATITIS A
HEPATITIS B
HEPATITIS C
HEPATITIS D
HEPATITIS E

 

There are five main hepatitis viruses, referred to as types A, B, C, D and E. Since the development of jaundice is a characteristic feature of liver disease, a correct diagnosis can only be made by testing patients’ sera for the presence of specific viral antigens and/or anti-viral antibodies.

Hepatitis A and E are typically caused by ingestion of contaminated food or water. Hepatitis B, C and D usually occur as a result of direct blood contact with infected body fluids (e.g. from blood transfusions, contaminated needles), or sexual contact.

The symptoms of hepatitis include jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes), dark urine, extreme fatigue, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain.
 

Diagnosis

Since cases of acute viral hepatitis caused by different viruses are not clinically distinguishable, diagnosis is made by blood tests which detect specific antibodies to the particular virus or by detection of particular viral DNA or RNA.